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Left, not right.

I had my GP doctor appointment yesterday. He told me that the cyst is on my left ovary. I was so stunned that he double checked the scans. Why didn’t the OB-Gyn tell me? Why did he say that my left ovary would not need removal because it probably isn’t even functioning (due to menopause)? If he had told me it was the left ovary, I would have asked a very important question: what is causing all the pain on the right side? It was the right-sided pain that brought me to the doctor to begin with.

The GP also pointed out that the gyno had ordered the CA125 test but I hadn’t done it. Why, he asked. Good question! Well, no one told me to get blood drawn. In fact, the gyno said it wasn’t necessary as the result wouldnt change his course of action (surgery).

I don’t know what to think about all this. Did the gyno make broad assumptions and fail to read my chart? That’s not the kind of doctor I want to perform a complicated surgery on my body. The GP said depending on the outcome of the cancer marker test, we could then do another blood test that will determine if I’m indeed in menopause. I don’t have a monthly cycle because I had the lining of my uterus removed in 2010, so its difficult to tell if menopause started, and I haven’t had much in the way of classic menopause symptoms. This is a key factor in determining whether surgery is necessary. A non-menopausal ovary can create simple cysts with no cause for alarm, whereas a menopausal ovary should not, and one must suspect cancer as a likelihood. At the very, very least the gyno should have already ordered that blood test, instead of just assuming I’m in menopause due to my age.

Unfortunately, the CA125 test results won’t be available until probably Monday, so stay tuned!

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